Barlow says: “In order to make them, she ordered a lot of traditional church kneelers, took them apart, and found out how they were fabricated. Wilhelmina Barns-Graham (1912-2004) was a key figure in the abstract movement in Britain yet it was only towards the end of her long and productive life that she received the critical attention she deserved. 1971, Seoul) consistent curiosity about the world and tireless experimentation with materializing the complexity of identities in flux. haegue yang - strange attractors tate st ives october 24, 2020 – may 3, 2021. But Yang’s sculptural response to Li is a more cuddly, tufty-eared, furry-faced, squat figure, constructed of red bells and black synthetic straw; if anything, it reminds me of one of the Star Wars franchise’s most lovable creatures, the Ewok. haegue yang. Lie of The Land at MK Gallery 2019 I felt so exposed to nature and the local cultural and sacred landscapes. Room 32 – the largest and one of the most visited rooms of the National Gallery displaying 17th-century Italian paintings by artists including Caravaggio, Artemisia and Orazio Gentileschi, Guido Reni and Guercino – will reopen with an enriched re-hang in July 2020 after a 21-month refurbishment. The Cornish landscape and its ancient archaeological heritage are important points of inspiration. Marc and Annette Kemmler Collection. I never stop examining. Artificial straw, powder-coated steel frame, powder-coated mesh, casters. Artificial straw, powder-coated steel frame, powder-coated mesh, casters, 203 x 120 x 120 cm. She has also created a number of different performance and video works. With additional support from Kvadrat, Tate Members and Tate St Ives Members. Unlit, they looked sad, inanimate and somewhat puzzling. 01736 796226. Photo: Taipei Fine Arts Museum ... Tate St Ives . @tate. Sonic Intermediate – Parameters and Unknowns after Hepworth 216 x 125 x 125 cm. Haegue Yang creates installations that include photographic, video, and sculptural elements and are informed by the artist’s philosophical and political investigations. Drying racks, light bulbs, cable, zip ties, terminal strips. Yang’s choice highlights the unique sculptural possibilities of these ordinary window coverings. This one Yang has copied, and accompanied it with other similarly cosmic themed companions. Lorenz devised a shape for this chaos theory, which resembles a butterfly; and a large mirrored sculpture represented within the wallpaper evokes that very butterfly, while, elsewhere, graph paper sections and curving sine waves presumably represent the art of plotting and mapping. UK’s largest exhibition to date by South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Her sculptures and installations often use industrially made objects, interwoven with labour-intensive and craft-based processes. Installation view of Haegue Yang: Strange Attractors at Tate St Ives, 2020. The exhibition’s title is a concept taken from mathematics and relates to complex patterns of behaviour in chaotic natural systems. Handcrafted over the centuries by local needlewomen, the church’s kneeling cushions fascinated Yang, in particular one that depicted a solar eclipse. This is the first exhibition at Tate St Ives to take place across both the award-winning top-lit gallery in the new building and the spectacular sea-facing gallery in the original building. In the Cone of Uncertainty foregrounds Haegue Yang’s (b. Temporarily closed. Making Doha at National Museum of Qatar 2019. But there is also something of corn dollies and that tradition of rural craftsmanship, now almost lost in western Europe. Haegue Yang’s fantastic beasts descend on Tate St Ives. Six of Yang’s Sonic Half Moons (2014-15), complete with drooping, bell-strung tendrils, rise up to the ceiling between and around these frames, their physical placement and context giving them a half-celestial, half-aquatic, drifting quality (apparently the gallery assistants will give them a spin now and again, so their delightful tinkling skirts can be heard and seen, spinning around). Haegue Yang. Her sculptures and installations often use industrially made objects, interwoven with labour-intensive and craft-based processes. Sonic Intermediate – Parameters an, Haegue Yang. Sung Hwan Kim’s installation continues until the end of October. Yang will transform these two spaces into an open-ended exploration of geometry, abstraction and the aftermath of modernism. Nov 2,2019-Apr 5,2020. Photo: Nick Ash. To the left of them is another intriguing frame, its curved edges, blond wooden planes and modular construction resembling an arty Ikea bookshelf, albeit one supporting a series of what look like prayer cushions. Gabo’s Sonic Intermediate alter ego is a more geometrically austere character, his “head” made of layers of shiny metal, after Gabo’s Constructed Head no 2 (1916), while Li’s strikes a shaman-style pose very similar to Li’s own photographic portrait in the adjacent gallery, standing in a hooded robe, with a broomstick in his hand. Courtesy of the artist. Haegue Yang Sol LeWitt Upside Down - Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three 2015 On display at Tate Modern part of Materials and Objects Some may be more serene, but it’s mostly chaotic. She is a Professor at the Staedelschule in Frankfurt am Main. The instinctive response is to clutch at what seems immediately appealing, almost familiar: three figures Yang has created for the show to evoke the spirits of Barbara Hepworth, Naum Gabo and the lesser known, but contemporaneous Chinese artist Li Yuan-chia. Berlin-based South Korean artist Haegue Yang has been taking the art world by storm and her largest exhibition to date in the UK opens at the Tate St Ives on 24 October. For the first time at Tate St Ives, the exhibition will be staged across both the award-winning top-lit gallery in the new building and the spectacular sea-facing gallery in the original building. From Haegue Yang's immersive installations to Zanele Muholi's powerful portraits, we're excited for our upcoming show openings! Sonic Intermediate – Parameters and Unknowns After Hepworth (part of Sonic Intermediates – Three Differential Equations, 2020). 4 minutes read. Born in South Korea in 1971, Haegue Yang is based in Berlin and Seoul and teaches at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main. Haegue Yang: Strange Attractors is curated by Anne Barlow, Director of Tate St Ives, with Assistant Curator Giles Jackson. With additional support from Kvadrat, Tate Members and Tate St Ives Members. This gallery is very dense in terms of how she’s put it all together.”. Major exhibition of existing and new work by South Korean artist Haegue Yang, renowned for her vast and non-binary artistic languages. Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, West Sussex, is showing Barbara Hepworth: The Hospital Drawings. From Haegue Yang's immersive installations to Zanele Muholi's powerful portraits, we're excited for our upcoming show openings! Haegue Yang. This autumn, the Tate St Ives will host Strange Attractors by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang. It will be accompanied by a catalogue published by Tate Publishing and designed by Berlin-based Studio Manuel Raeder, as well as a programme of talks and events in the gallery. Gently moving with ventilated air, the fabric’s shimmering colour overlaps with the hue of the ocean beyond, while its moiré effect will cast a blue-green light over a group of ethereal drying rack sculptures, Non-Indépliables, nues. by Sinéad McCarthy, exh. Making Doha at National Museum of Qatar 2019. The Cornish landscape and its ancient archaeological heritage are important points of inspiration. Craft + Design Centre and acclaimed Italian design consulting studio Mr.Lawrence, together with 1+1 Design Gallery, Milan, will present the collective exhibition GLASS UTOPIA as part of the international Venice Glass Week from 3 until 26 September 2020. Arthur Lanyon for Private Client, Oxford 2019. Created specifically for the digital space, the exhibition confronts the realities and tensions between our private selves and our online personas. Photo: Studio Haegue Yang, The Art Gallery of New South Wales is delighted to present. Haegue Yang: The exhibition at Tate St Ives [set to reopen after the national COVID-19 lockdown] brings together existing works with new pieces inspired by my visits to Cornwall in 2018-19. The main thematics of meteorology come through the exhibition and this environment. The Intermediate – Tilted Bushy Lumpy Bumpy, 2016. They are the latest evolution of an earlier series, called the Intermediates, which comprises movable sculptures made of quasi-natural and hand-crafted elements; but these, thanks to the addition of bells – another favourite Yang component - are dubbed Sonic Intermediates. Here, Yang has assembled some of her characteristic domestic elements, the choreographies of which entail folding and unfolding – venetian blinds and laundry racks are a recurring motif. Haegue Yang: Strange Attractors is curated by Anne Barlow, Director of Tate St Ives, with Assistant Curator Giles Jackson. There are references to humankind’s attempts to control water – images of dams, for example – but on the other hand, the suggestion is that it’s impossible to control nature. Tate St Ives 24 October 2020 – 3 May 2021. Another strand to Yang’s work is her fascination with human responses to nature, from the primal via the surreal to the downright dysfunctional. The Art Gallery of New South Wales is delighted to present Hyper-linked, an online exhibition of Together In Art New Work by seven contemporary Australian artists. Non-Indépliables, nues, 2010-20. Yang spins you on a wild waltz with the modernists populating Tate St Ives to galaxies beyond. Haegue Yang in her exhibition When The Year 2000 Comes at Kukje Gallery, Seoul, 2019 © Haegue Yang, courtesy Kukje Gallery, Seoul. The one inspired by Hepworth (Parameters and Unknowns After Hepworth, 2020) is a three-part, voluptuous thing of pierced spheres formed by tiny, bronzed bells. Mundus Cushion – Yielding X incorporates Yang’s variations on ‘church kneelers’ – traditionally depicting religious symbols – which Yang has abstracted into her own unique explorations of the sacred and the secular. Here, she focuses on white plastic-coated laundry racks. I can see they might also be wryly poking fun at our human tendency to pray for divine intervention as a means of clearing up our own messes or averting disaster, although Yang’s intentions here may have been more generous. “These are scenes that might conjure up the landscape around here, but they are also universal. Why are they there? Taking this theory as a starting point, Yang’s exhibition creates an environment in which uncanny and seemingly disparate ideas, cultures, relations and time periods coexist. Tate St Ives, United Kingdom October 24, 2020 – May 03, 2021 This autumn Tate St Ives will stage Strange Attractors, the UK’s largest exhibition to date by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Haegue Yang. Liverpool Biennial, Liverpool 2018. 4 minutes read. But a few hours later, with their bulbs in place and lit, they come strangely to life; lightbulbs representing energy and also, perhaps, enlightenment. If they are meant to suggest doors, where are they and where might they lead? This is the first exhibition at Tate St Ives to take place across both the award-winning top-lit gallery in the new building and the spectacular sea-facing gallery in the original building. It’s like a duvet, it wraps around you, and you’re lost in it’, Natacha Nisic – interview: ‘We needed a place for free expression, a visibility, a female presence’. Powder-coated steel frame, powder-coated mesh, powder-coated handles, casters, copper plated bells, metal rings, plastic twine, 216 x 125 x 125 cm. They can be flat or three dimensional, opaque or transparent, compressed or expanded. I have encountered the work of Yang (b1971) once before, at her South London Gallery show in 2019, but, still, the first impact is intense: my eyes - and mind - balk at the sight of a hundred bright, shiny door handles of polished chrome and brass fastened across two of the large, white gallery walls. This one-way route guides you through the Modern Art and St Ives displays, taking in spectacular views out onto Porthmeor beach, followed by the exhibition Strange Attractors by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Porthmeor Beach, St Ives, Cornwall, TR26 1TG . The intersection between art and craft is also a strong preoccupation, as Anne Barlow, the Tate St Ives director who put this show together with Yang, says: “She’s very interested in blurring the boundaries between fine art and craft.”, Most dominant of the many components choreographed around this room to Yang’s specification is the large back wall entirely covered in her own bespoke wallpaper, some of which bleeds around and along the adjacent right-hand wall: a random-seeming collage of stock imagery, most of which features turbulent fountains, clouds and waves of water. Photo: Studio Haegue Yang. Courtesy of Galerie Barbara Wien, Berlin. One of our exciting projects is Haegue Yang’s solo exhibition for the MMCA Hyundai Motor Series. Born in South Korea in 1971, Haegue Yang is based in Berlin and Seoul and teaches at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main. Yang is renowned for creating immersive environments from a diverse range of materials. by Carla Cugini, Cologne 2018. Photo: Tate (Matt Greenwood). Kenneth Clark: Looking for Civilisation Berlin-based South Korean artist Haegue Yang has been taking the art world by storm and her largest exhibition to date in the UK opens at the Tate St Ives on 24 October. This autumn Tate St Ives will stage Strange Attractors, the UK’s largest exhibition to date by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Humour is a major thread throughout Yang’s work. The materiality and aesthetics of her work are derived from her inventive methods, from using industrial and everyday materials to labour-intensive and craft-based procedures that create creature-like sculptures. Living between Seoul and Berlin, Yang employs industrially produced quotidian items, digital processes, and labor-intensive craft techniques. This, says Barlow, is typical of Barlow’s contradictory practice, with some elements fastidiously planned and pristine, and others left to chance. As is evident from the title of her Tilted Bush Lumpy Bumpy (2016) character, an earlier Intermediate, and one of three arranged deeper into the main gallery. This autumn, the Tate St Ives will host Strange Attractors by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang Words by Jessica-Christin Hametner The exhibition, which will be Yang’s largest to date in the UK, includes examples of her widely known household items, such as light bulbs, brooms and drying racks. Major exhibition of existing and new work by South Korean artist Haegue Yang, renowned for her vast and non-binary artistic languages.The materiality and aesthetics of her work are derived from her inventive methods, from using industrial and everyday materials to labour-intensive and craft-based procedures that create creature-like sculptures. Beyond its subcategory of attribution, less tangible questions of judgment, taste and even background made connoisseurship as subject to caricature as Clark, whose style of criticism was doomed in this review as a fragile remnant of a dying world. Haegue Yang 양혜규 梁慧圭 / Liverpool Biennial 2018 309 views 7 months ago Installation view of Beautiful world, where are you?, Liverpool Biennial, Tate Liverpool, 2018 Yang is renowned for creating immersive environments from a diverse range of materials. But the real reason Li is here is because his participatory, multidisciplinary, playful and cosmologically oriented practice resonates strongly with Yang’s. Hepworth and Gabo have obvious links with St Ives – both adopted this part of Cornwall to carry out their bold, modernist experimentations; Hepworth’s garden studio is preserved in gently faded splendour a five-minute walk down the road. 203 x 120 x 120 cm. But it is Li, whose single work in the Tate St Ives collection Yang discovered while researching for this show in 2018, who apparently helped to consolidate the idea to incorporate biographical tributes to this important 20th-century trio in the show. Haegue Yang: Strange Attractors is curated by Anne Barlow, Director of Tate St Ives, with Assistant Curator Giles Jackson. Haegue Yang: Strange Attractors, Tate St Ives, St Ives, UK Ground/work, The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, US MMCA Hyundai Motor Series 2020: Haegue Yang – O2 &H20, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA), Seoul, Korea Haegue Yang: Emergence, Art Gallery of Ontario, Ontario, Canada 2019 Gloriously fun and chaotic, Haegue Yang's exploration of the domestic, cultural and spiritual responses to the natural world is a definite conversation starter. The show coincides with the 65th anniversary year of the launch of Britain’s pioneering National Health Service in 1948. This autumn Tate St Ives will stage Strange Attractors, the UK’s largest exhibition to date by celebrated South Korean artist Haegue Yang. Haegue Yang: Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Cube Structures Based on Five Modules, Central One Expanded 184 Times, Another Expanded 66 Times then Doubled and Mirrored #81-E, Maison Hermès Dosan Park, Seoul, Korea Ornament and Abstraction, kurimanzutto, Mexico City, Mexico 2016 Quasi-Pagan Seasonal Shift, Aïshti by the Sea, Antelias, Lebanon Wilhelmina Barns-Graham: In Perspective – The Late Works Craft + Design Centre and acclaimed Italian design consulting studio Mr.Lawrence, together with 1+1 Design Gallery, Milan, will present the collective exhibition. Supported by Henry Moore Foundation and Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen. Her sculptures and installations often use industrially made objects, interwoven with labour-intensive and craft-based processes. Studio International is published by: This one reminds me of the cavemen – the wonderfully named Slag Brothers - whose whirling, spindly legs powered their basic, stone-age automobile in Hanna-Barbera’s iconic 1960s cartoon Wacky Races. Website Opening times. cat. Her colourful installations and performative sculptures frequently combine domestic and industrial materials with sound and light. As a reminder of the unpredictability of life, Yang has stuck an assortment of square wooden boards on to this wallpaper, which she apparently prepares with a thin layer of varnish in her studio, and then leaves out to attract whatever dust, fragments or leaves might be swirling around.